Why Shop at Online Stores?

As the season changes, everyone wants to get out and buy cool clothes and dresses. Some prefer to go shopping with friends at all the trendy stores. A new season means a new wardrobe and a whole new line up clothes. While nothing beats the fun of hunting for a dress or the perfect pair of shoes with a friend, you can now do this more comfortably. I am, of course, talking about the vast array of online stores that have cropped up to cater to your every need.

Reason 1: Online stores come in all shapes and sizes, specifically speaking. They may cater to a particular type of shopper, or they may sell a wide variety of clothes and accessories. That is not the only purpose of online stores. At these websites you can find a lot of useful information about the latest trends. What is in this season? And what is out? You can find the answers to all these questions and more at these stores.

Reason 2: Online stores are not just places for women shoppers. Most stores have a separate section for men. The kid's section is also worth taking a peek at if you are looking for some new clothes for your toddler. In fact, the wide range of selections available often makes decisions a lot harder, but no less fun. Online stores make the shopping experience much easier and hassle-free. If you are not comfortable with the price tag of an item, you can simply look elsewhere. The World Wide Web is a big place, which means that there are countless places to shop. However, the best stores offer high quality dresses and accessories at affordable prices. Once you find a good online store, you should stick with it.

Reason 3: Do you know what is in style this season? You are sure to find all the trendiest clothes online. You can buy dresses online, and have them shipped right to your home. Many online stores even offer free shipping within the United States. The important thing to remember when shopping online is to keep an open mind and lots of available time on your hands. Most online stores stock more items than any of your local clothing stores. It is easy to get lost in a mire of fashionable clothes, accessories, and shoes. If you want to save time, then stick to the items you absolutely need and leave random browsing for a later time.

Five Multi-Channel Marketing Mistakes to Avoid

Mistake # 1: Nothing is Connected

Rather than setting up individual channels as lonely little islands on the internet, you can integrate them so they work together seamlessly and can be managed from a single, centralized tool. Hootsuite, for instance, gives you the ability to post content in the Hootsuite dashboard and automatically post it to any (or all) other channels through one easy-to-use interface. But if you do not have an integrated system, you risk spending too much time posting to individual channels or worse, not posting anything because the task looks too big and time consuming.

The Fix:

Integrate your marketing channels. By integrating marketing channels, you can work with a "write once, publish to many" model that saves time and ensures consistency across all your marketing. You may need some outside professional help with the integration work itself, but it is well worth it in the time and effort you'll save when making posts or running marketing campaigns in a multi-channel system.

Mistake # 2: New Information is Infrequent or Sporadic

Marketing is an ongoing activity – you can not just set up a website and a social profile or two and think that you're done. It is critical that you add new information, articles, posts, and comments on a regular basis. Without consistent activity, your marketing efforts will do little to promote your business, bring in new leads, or help build customer loyalty and engagement.

With sporadic or infrequent updates, you also open the door for your competitors to gain momentum, visibility, and new customers if your social profiles just sit there with little activity. It's important that you commit to a sustained, ongoing effort to "feed and care" for your multi-channel strategy in order for it to get results for your business.

The Fix:

Create a Content Pipeline. A Content Pipeline can be as simple as printing out a monthly calendar, then selecting the days you want to post or add new content to your website, social profiles, and / or other marketing channels. For example, if your business newsletter has three articles, you can use one article each week as a new social post, then share a link to an interesting blog post (on your website or elsewhere) as the post for the fourth week. Having everything planned out ahead of time makes it easy to keep information flowing smoothly in a multi-channel system.

Mistake # 3: No Mobile Site

  • There are more than one billion people using mobile devices today.
  • More than 61% of mobile users say that if they do not find a mobile site , they will immediately leave to keep searching for one.
  • 50% of users said that even if they liked a business, they would use it less often if the website does not work on a mobile device.

Still think you do not need a mobile site for your business?

A mobile site is not the same as a desktop site displayed on a smaller screen. Mobile sites have less content but are typically more focused and to the point. They also include unique features like click-to-call buttons, larger text, "thumb-friendly" navigation and links, etc. A regular desktop site when viewed on a mobile device is often very difficult to use, as the links and buttons are too tiny to use on a small touch screen, and the content is all but unreadable due to size.

The Fix:

If you do not have a mobile site, or if your regular desktop website is less-than-wonderful when viewed on a mobile device, consider adding a mobile website for your business.

Mobile devices are now the first screen of choice for users, meaning that more people could be accessing your website from a mobile phone or tablet than their PC or laptop. What type of mobile experience is waiting for your visitors?

About 93% of small businesses do NOT yet have a mobile website, so if you're one of them, this is a great opportunity to reach more customers right away, plus get a jump on your competitors!

Mistake # 4: Missing or Incorrect SEO

Ever since Google's Penguin and Panda updates in 2012, SEO techniques and ranking signals have changed – a lot. If you had SEO work done during or prior to 2012, chances are that the techniques used are not only outdated and non-standard today, but they could even work against you in the search engines (like sites with technical errors, old SEO tactics, Deprecated HTML, etc.).

Today, search engines have little regard for websites that are built with outdated, non-standard code, or that contain technical errors or outdated SEO tricks. If your site was optimized more than two years ago, it is probably time to re-evaluate the techniques used on your site and repair or correct as necessary.

If your site is not properly coded and optimized, it will eventually hurt your search engine positions.

The Fix:

Optimize your website, social profiles, email campaigns, and mobile campaigns so that everything meets with today's standards and gives the search engine spiders exactly the information they need to accurately read and index your online assets. Do not forget that content freshness, originality, and share-ability are now important ranking signals to Google, so make sure your multi-channel strategy is addressing these criteria as well.

Mistake # 5: Not Enough Quality Website Content

Google now counts quality content as one of its major ranking factors, so if your website has old content, has not been updated in a while, or has very little index-able content on the pages, it's time to fix it. Pages with only a couple of paragraphs of text, or pages with stale content, are going to be dropped in favor of pages that have fresh content and top-quality information, articles, and other original material.

The Fix:

Make sure your website has plenty of interesting, high-quality information that users will find compelling. Also make a plan for adding new content to your website at least monthly, and make sure that your content is fresher and of better quality than what your top competitors provide. Websites that do not have fresh, useful content are going to be dropped from the search results – do not let your site be one of them.

The Multi-Channel Advantage

By avoiding these five common mistakes in your multi-channel strategy you can more easily manage your online marketing efforts while gaining the benefits of increased customer engagement, a more visible online presence for your business, and improved search engine rankings – all at the same time .

Major Facts About Partnership And Business

A partnership can be defined as an association of two or more persons who have agreed to combine their labor, property, and skill, or some or all of them, for the purpose of engaging in legal business and sharing profits and losses between them.

Partnerships present the involved parties with special challenges that must be communicated before agreement. Overarching goals, levels of give-and-take, areas of responsibility, lines of authority and success, how success is evaluated and distributed, and often a variety of other factors must all be negotiated. Once agreement is reached, the partnership is typically enforceable by civil law, especially if well documented. Partners who wish to make their agreement affirmatively explicit and enforceable typically draw up Articles of Partnership.

A partnership is particularly very attractive if it helps to pool the talents or skills of partners for their mutual benefit. Partnerships require individuals who are compatible, honest, healthy, capable, dedicated and equally motivated to succeed. And because of the voluntary nature of partnerships, they are reliably easy to set up.
The term business in this definition includes every trade, occupation, and profession. Therefore, this article becomes very necessary for every individual to have the idea of ​​bargaining / planning and negotiation in any kind of business level.

Humans are social beings, partnerships between individuals, businesses, interest-based organizations, schools, governments, and diverse combinations thereof, have always been and remain commonplace. In the most frequently associated instance of the term, a partnership is formed between one or more businesses in which partners (owners) co-labor to achieve and share profits and losses. Partnerships exist within, and across, sectors. Non-profit, religious, and political organizations may partner together to increase the likelihood of each achieving their mission and to amplify their reach. It is sometimes considered as alliance, governments may partner to achieve their national interests.

A partner acts as an agent of the firm in the conduct of its business. A partner must, however, exercise the highest degree of good faith in all transactions with the other partners, devote time and attention to the partnership business, and must account to the other partners for any secret profits made in the conduct of the partnership business. The liability of a partner for partnership debts is said to be unlimited, except when the partner is a limited one in a limited partnership organized in accordance with the provisions of a state statute permitting such limitation of liability.

A partnership comes into existence by a contract entered into by the parties concerned. No formality is required but the agreement could be writing, inferior from conduct or oral. The agreement to form a partnership is known as a "Partnership Contract", the most important provision of which spells out the manner in which profits are to be distributed.

Partnerships are governed by the law of contract. It is advisable for individuals who wish to form a partnership to draw up what we called "Articles of Partnership". The article of Partnership essentially contains these items below:
• Name of Partnership
• Name and Addresses of each partner
• Statement of Business Purpose (s)
• Duration of the Partnership
• Name and Location of the Business
• Amount Invested by Each Partner
• Ratio for Sharing Profit
• Accounting Records and their Accessibility to Partners
• Specific Duties of Each Partner
• Provision or the Dissolution of Partnership and Sharing of Net Assets.
• Provision for Protection of Surviving Partners, Decedent's Estate, etc.
• Restraints on a Partner's Assumption of Special Obligations.

There are five types of partners:
1. Active Partner: – This is the partner who participates in all the activities of the partnership.
2. Dormant or Sleeping Partner: – This is the partner who does not take an active part in the activities of the partnership but shares in the profit.
3. Nominal Partner: – This is a person who lends his name to a lends his name to the partners for a consideration.
4. Secret Partner: – This is a partner who takes an active part in the affairs of the company but he / she is not known by the public as part of the partnership.
5. Silent Partner: – This is a partner who is known by the public as part of the partnership; But he / she does not take an active part in the management of the enterprise.

1. Greater Source of Capital: – The pooling of the individual resources of each partner helps to raise a large capital. It makes it possible for an individual with the know-how, new product, invention, or new idea but no money, to work with man with money who is interested in the project.

2. Greater Specialized Management: – The ownership of a business by two or more people makes it possible for them to pool their skills and judgment for the benefit of all concerned.

3. Greater Incentive for Employees: – Employees in partnerships tend to enjoy better fringe benefit package and higher salies. They have better prospects for earned recognition and promotions.

4. Legal Recognition: – There is a partnership law that regulates the relationship between partners themselves, and between the partners and their parties that they have to deal with.

1. Personality Clashes: – Partnership require cooperation, trust and dedication but failure on the part of one of the active partners to discharge his / her own responsibilities that could have led to personality clashes and to the end of the partnership. Partnerships are known to have ended because the members could not agree on the best course of action to take on an important issue.

2. Difficulty in Withdrawals: – The contribution of each partner ceases to be the property of the individual making the contribution. When a partner needs money, he / she can not withdraw his / her contribution or borrow money from the partnership without the express permission of the other partners. Many entrepreneurs dislike this lack of flexibility characteristic of partnerships.

3. Unlimited Liability: – Each partner is held liable for the obligations of the partnership. If one of the partners makes a costly mistake in the execution of the affairs of the partnership, creditors can sue, and if they obtain judgment against the partnership, each partner may have to sell his / her personal assets to meet the obligations.

4. Short Length of Life: – Factors like, death, prolonged ill-health, withdrawal, bankruptcy, insanity or of sorts could lead to the end of the partnership.

Conclusively, governmentally recognized partnerships may enjoy special benefits in tax policies. Among developed countries, for example, business partnerships are often favored over corporations in taxation policy, since dividend taxes only occur on profits before they are distributed to the partners. However, depending on the partnership structure and the jurisprudence in which it operates, owners of a partnership may be exposed to greater personal liability than they would as shareholders of a corporation.

Evaluating Credit Card Offers: Essential Terms You Must Understand

Credit card offers, they're everywhere! They appear in your mailbox. They pop up while you're surfing the Internet. They're in slick brochures next to the cash register or gas pump. They're in full-page ads in the Sunday papers.

If you need a new credit card, how do you choose? You should evaluate each offer carefully, and to do that you must understand these essential terms.

Annual Percentage Rate (APR) :

The interest rate charged on your account balance. (But see "Balance Calculation Methods," because the rules for computing interest from your balance and your APR can vary.) Your statement will typically show the APR and a monthly and / or daily rate based on the APR that's actually used to calculate your Monthly interest. There may be several APRs applicable to different portions of your balance, for example an introductory rate, a regular purchase rate, and a regular cash advance rate.

A fixed APR is set by the credit card company, which can generally change it with as little as 15 days advance notice, especially if you run afoul of any of the "gotchas" in the terms. These "gotchas" are often very consumer-unfriendly. For example, many companies these days reserve the right to raise your rate if you've been late on a payment to another, unrelated company.

A variable APR is tied to some widely used economic index, such as the Prime Rate. It may be stated as "prime + x%, currently y%," for example "prime + 7%, currently 13.5%." This means that when the Prime Rate is 6.5%, your APR is 13.5%. When the Prime Rate goes up or down, so does your APR. But beware, because some of the same "gotchas" apply to variable APRs as to fixed APRs. Read the fine print. It may state that if you're late with one payment, your APR will no longer be variable but will rise to an exorbitant fixed rate, usually over 20%.

The penalty APR is the rate to which your APR will immediately be raised when you violate any of the "gotchas" in the terms. This rate is usually at least 50% higher than the regular APR. Again, be sure to read the fine print to see what situations will trigger the penalty APR. You'll often see these: failure to pay this or any other account on time, exceeding your credit limit on this or any other account, excessive credit balances on your accounts in aggregate.

Balance Calculation Methods:

These are important to understand, because your APR is only part of the story when it comes to calculating the interest you'll be charged each month. The other part is how the balance is calculated to which the APR is applied. In any case the balance is multiplied by the daily or monthly interest rate. But the balance calculation is not as straightforward as you might think.

1. Two-Cycle Balance. This is the worst method from a consumer's point of view because it can lead to the highest interest calculations. Unfortunately, it's also becoming the most widely used method. To calculate the balance, add together the average daily balances for the current billing period (sometimes even including new charges) and the previous period. Here's why this is so unfriendly to you. Say you have run a balance for a few months and finally pay it from $ 200 down to zero at the end of May. You think it's safe to use the card in June for a new $ 100 purchase, and if you pay the $ 100 by the end of the June grace period, you will not owe any interest on it. But you're wrong. Since your average daily balance in May was not zero (say it was $ 120), and since you used the card in June, your interest will be calculated on May's average balance again, so even if you pay the whole June purchase in June, you Will still owe additional interest. In other words, you must wait two months, allow the account to cycle once with a zero balance, before it's safe to use it again – "safe" in the sense that you will not incur extra interest if you pay the balance in full By the end of the grace period.

2. Average Daily Balance. This was once the most common calculation method and is still popular. Add the daily balance for each day in the billing cycle, then divide by the number of days in the cycle. Depending on the terms, this may or may not include new charges.

3. Adjusted Balance. This is the best method from a consumer's point of view, but it's rapidly going the way of the dodo. Take the balance at the beginning of the billing cycle, then subtract any payments or other credits recorded during the cycle. Do not include new charges during the cycle. For example, if your beginning balance was $ 1200, and you paid $ 400 during the cycle, the balance to which your monthly rate will be applied is $ 800, regardless of any new charges.

Balance Transfer:

This means that you're charging card X to pay off (all or part of) the balance on card Y. So the balance is, in effect, transferred from card Y to card X. Why would you want to do this? Usually to take advantage of an introductory low interest rate when applying for a new card. Look closely at the terms. Sometimes these introductory rates last only a few months. The best ones are for the life of the balance. You will often have to pay a transaction fee equal to 3% of the balance transferred. Sometimes these fees are capped at $ 75 or so. Be sure to see whether or not the transaction fee excepts what you'll save in interest. If so, do not do it. Sometimes the credit card company will agree to waive the fee, especially on a new account. Do not be afraid to ask.

Cash Advance:

A cash loan charged immediately to your credit card account. Usually there is no grace period for paying off a cash advance, which means you'll be charged interest starting from the day of the loan, even if you pay it in full by the end of the billing cycle. Also this type of charge may have a higher APR than purchases or balance transfers. Check your terms. Note that some kinds of transactions, like buying casino chips or lottery tickets, may be valued as cash advances. This can also apply to writing a purchase check to your own bank account. Be sure to read the fine print.

Credit Limit:

The upper limit on your account balance. Exceeding it may result in penalties. Be very careful if your balance is close to the limit ("maxed out"), because you can exceed it without charging anything new if you fail to pay enough. Remember that just because the company has approved you for a certain limit does not mean you can afford to take on that much debt.

Disclosure Chart:

An important portion of the Terms and Conditions statement. It's a little bit like the Nutrition Statement on a food package because the law dictates what has to be listed here. If you can not stand to read all the fine print, be sure that you read this part.

  1. Fixed APR or APRs after any introductory rate (s) have expired
  2. Rule (s) for calculating variable APR (s) if applicable
  3. Grace period
  4. Annual fee if applicable
  5. Minimum per-cycle finance charge
  6. Additional fees if applicable, such as cash advance fees
  7. Balance calculation method
  8. Late payment and delinquency fees
  9. Over limit fees

Grace Period:

The time, calculated from the account cycle date, during which you can pay the balance in full without having any interest charged. This usually applies only to purchases, and only if you've paid the previous month's balance in full and on time. (Sometimes even that's not enough. See "Two-Cycle Balance" calculation method for an additional "gotcha.")


This can be very misleading. It does not mean the company is guaranteeing to issue you the card in the offer. It just means that they chose you to receive this offer based on some general screening of your credit report. They always reserve the right to deny or alter the offer based on a more detailed examination of your records.